Recording Your Sugar Measurements

The key to proper treatment of diabetes is providing enough insulin for the calories that you eat. Carbohydrate calories tend to cause quicker/higher spikes in your sugar. One common method of treating diabetes is to provide a baseline of long-acting insuiln (Lantus [insulin glargine] or Levemir [insuiln detemir]) at bedtime (or sometimes, splitting the dose in the morning and at bedtime) PLUS a short acting insulin (Humalog [insuiln lispro] or Novalog [insulin aspart]) given with meals. Sometimes, the short-acting insulin is given only with the largest meal of the day, and sometimes it is given with every meal. Sometimes, the dose of the short-acting insuilin is adjusted based on the "carb count" of your meal, and sometimes it is given simply as a fixed dose with the meal. Sometimes, we substitute a short-acting oral medicine (like Prandin [repaglinide]) instead of insulin in some people. No matter how this is done, however, the key to success is to KNOW what your sugars are doing at different times of the day.

To help figure out the best regimen for you, we suggest that you check your sugars at many different times of the day. To do this EVERY day would be time-consuming, expensive and painful. So, instead of checking your sugars 6-8 times per day, we suggest you check your sugars just BEFORE and 2 hours AFTER a certain meal a few days per week. So, on Monday, maybe you would check you sugar before lunch and then 2 hours after lunch. On Wednesday, you would check just before breakfast and 2 hours after breakfast, and on Sunday, you would check just before supper and 2 hours after supper. The next Tuesday, try checking your sugar in the morning before breakfast, and then that night just before bedtime. By doing this, you are basically checking your sugars SEVEN times per day, but spreading the pain and cost over about a week or so.

The problem we have, though, is trying to figure out what these numbers mean. Many patients bring scraps of paper to the office - with sugars and times recorded. This is helpful, but very DIFFICULT to decipher during the visit. To make it easier for us to follow what you are doing, we ask that you use the following record. Bring this back to the office with your next visit. By structuring your recordings in a format that we can read and understand quickly, we can help you adjust your diabetes treatment regimen more effectively.

DateBreakfastLunchSupperBedtime
Before2 hours afterBefore2 hours afterBefore2 hours after
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

DateBreakfastLunchSupperBedtime
Before2 hours afterBefore2 hours afterBefore2 hours after